Using TV Data to Optimize Digital

January 5, 2014

As the TV and digital worlds begin to merge, one of the more interesting new capabilities that advertisers and their agencies should be exploring is using TV audience viewing data to plan and buy digital audiences to increase total campaign effectiveness.

Videology's Mark McKee on Bringing TV data into Digital

Videology’s Mark McKee on Bringing TV data into Digital

In this BeetTV video, Videology’s Mark McKee explains some of the thinking behind this.

Using TV data to Optimize Digital

This  is important because historically, TV and Online planning and buying were done separately in most cases, missing a great opportunity to extend reach beyond random duplication of audiences. I wrote about this opportunity in a separate blog post earlier this year.

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Mediapost Article: More 2014 Advertising Predictions

January 1, 2014

More 2014 Advertising Predictions: More Top Funnel Programmatic, Mobile Integration, Privacy Power, TV to Video

Here’s yet more 2014 advertising predictions, this time from Eric Bosco, CEO of Choicestream via Mediapost. Trend highlights:

  • More top of funnel programmatic ad buying
  • Increased integration of mobile
  • The rise of data privacy issues and emerging solutions
  • Video neutral planning and buying as TV and Video blur

I agree with all of these and think that the first one is particularly interesting, with much to learn about how creative, media weight, programming and site content impact top and bottom of funnel metrics differently.

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MediaPost TVBlog Interview — The 3R’s of Advertising Effectiveness

December 11, 2012

The following is a repost of David Goetzl’s November 27, TVBlog post:

——————————————————————————————————————————————————–

There’s no sense for advertisers to ever be fully satisfied with the effectiveness of their messaging and tactics. So, they’ll always be in search of more data and the finish line will keep moving.

But here’s at least one enticing landing spot: a gauge of how many consumers saw an ad on one of four screens (TV, PC, tablet, smartphone) and what it prompted them to do (or not) in real time — with the data coming in an easily digestible form, ripe for swift action.

David Goetzl Interview on the 3R's of Ad Effectiveness

David Goetzl Interview on the 3R’s of Ad Effectiveness

Randall Beard says Nielsen’s on that path with its “3R framework,” an umbrella term for its efforts to measure how reach and resonance lead to reaction. (It could be called 4Rs with an equation where reach + resonance + reaction = revenue.)

Helping in the kitchen are the 3Vs of Big Data, where there’s more volume and variety of information coming at greater velocity.

“There’s way more data, way faster that’s coming at advertisers and agencies,” said Beard, Nielsen’s global head of advertiser solutions. “And one of the big challenges is to have a simplified (platform) that brings it all together in a way that they can easily operationalize it.”

Beard will lead a webinar next week with details on how Nielsen envisions opportunities in a 3R playing field. In advance, he took some time to offer some thoughts:

–In the “reaction” area, the Nielsen Catalina Solutions services look to connect media consumption with purchase behavior. There are multiple research providers looking in that direction with TV advertising. What makes the offering different?

“The audience data is from the Nielsen people meter data set — supplemented by set-top-box data,” he said. “Most of the other players in the space are just simply using set-top-box data … The second thing is that we’re cross-platform, so we have this service not only with TV, but with online, with mobile, with print. So you can identify the most responsive buyer behavior group and then execute that across platforms.”

–If the same ad runs on live TV and online, which is more effective?

The data is not for the exact same ad on both platforms, but 2011 research found the “breakthrough” — percentage of consumers remembering an ad — for 15- and 30-second spots was about 50% higher in an online platform than TV. Hypotheses Beard offered include online platforms offering more of a lean-forward experience and usually a lesser ad load.

–Nielsen, of course, doesn’t determine what the currency is in a particular market. But can any of its “reaction” tools – Nielsen Catalina, Buyer Insights – offer the basis for one should advertisers want to trade on the data?

Beard indicated Nielsen believes it plays more of an advisory role, but there are opportunities for sort of one-off deals.

“We’re trying to bring data to the advertisers, agencies and media companies that they can use to be smarter about the way people plan buy, execute and ultimately optimize the advertising,” he said.

He said working with NBC, Nielsen has found the same ads in its Olympic programming have more “resonance” than when they run elsewhere and NBC has used that to demonstrate effectiveness in a sales process.

–One argument networks make is there is value in ads viewed as they zip by in fast-forward mode via DVRs. Logos might be seen or there may be some reinforcement if a viewer has seen the ad before in full. Has Nielsen developed any insight here through its research?

Not discretely. But it has found that ad recall is 30% lower for time-shifted viewing — whether an ad is skipped or not with a DVR — versus live TV.

“If you know that there’s a difference there, you can certainly assume that at least some part of a lower score in a DVR’d program is because of fast-forwarding,” Beard said. “How much? Couldn’t say.”

— One coveted metric in the “reaction” area would be: did an ad prompt a purchase the next day? (Helpful to consumer package goods and telecom marketers, among others.) Can a viewing-purchase link be available in a sort of overnight fashion a la the cornerstone Nielsen TV ratings?

Not yet. It takes time to connect the dots.

But in a “resonance” sphere – both with TV and digital ads – results come in much faster.

–But clearly the quicker the better – especially if there’s an emphasis on providing real-time insight to allow adjustments.

That’s a “big opportunity,” Beard said, across all platforms. That would give an advertiser with, say, three ads running a chance to determine certain effectiveness gauges for each and do some editing mid-flight.

That not only can improve “resonance,” but save money.

If a 15-second spot is doing just as well as a 30-second one, why stick with it?

“Why spend money on 30s,” Beard said. “Move all your spending to 15s … there’s lots of opportunities for advertisers, in particular, to measure “reach” and “resonance” in as close to real-time as possible and then make smart choices about how they allocate their spending, or improve their advertising  to get a better reaction outcome.”

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Digital Innovation – A Conversation with Group M’s Chief Digital Officer Rob Norman

November 20, 2012

Last week, the Paley Center for Media hosted their Innovation without Borders conference. I had the pleasure of leading a discussion with the inimitable Rob Norman, the Chief Digital Officer of Group M.

Paley Center for Media Innovation without Borders

In our discussion, Rob and I debated the fragmentation of the media landscape, the increasingly simultaneous consumption of media,  the need for end-to-end advertising measurement, the importance of standard metrics, and the role of real-time optimization, among other things.

Rob Norman — Chief Digital Officer, Group M

To see Rob’s take on these and other media and advertising topics, click here.

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Addressing the Trust Deficit in Advertising

September 17, 2012

Consumers increasing lack of trust doesn’t begin and end with government and other large public and private institutions. It applies to advertising as well. This should hardly be a surprise to anyone. Who trusts ads anyway?

What’s surprising is that advertising continues to work as well as it does when the majority of consumers say they “don’t trust (advertising) much or at all.” This is, no doubt, due to the creative power of great advertising—its ability to entertain as well as sell. Advertising works despite itself.

Trust in Advertising – Paid, Owned and Earned

In a recent Nielsen global study (disclosure: I work at Nielsen), all forms of paid advertising—TV, Print, Digital, Radio, etc., fared poorly on the trust factor. Conversely, and not surprisingly, “recommendations from people I know” scored highest on trust, with 92% of consumers trusting this source completely or somewhat. Owned media, such as brand websites, scored higher than paid advertising, but lower than social recommendations.

Trust In Advertising

Now What ? The Convergence of Paid, Owned and Earned

Now that we’ve demonstrated what many of us already knew, what should we do about it? Does trust in advertising even matter? If so, can we even do anything about it?  After all, the only advertising that most CMO’s control is their own (and some Ad Agency people would even debate that).

Since trust is a continuum , moving from earned (highest) to owned and then paid (lowest), it stands to reason that brands should want more earned and owned media. But giving up paid media? For most brands, this isn’t really feasible given both the broad reach and historical success associated with paid media.

Instead, we need to start thinking of how Paid, Owned and Earned media can work together to improve trust and deliver better results. Marketers continue to discuss them as if they are separate and discreet media. They’re increasingly not.

Technology is blurring the lines of paid, owned and earned media.  Paid media can now also be social. Social is often about paid. Owned media can have paid embedded in it. And sometimes, all three can exist in one consumer touchpoint. What’s a CMO to make of this trend?

3 Examples of Paid, Owned, Earned Convergence

1.       Paid Ads Work Harder with Social

What actually happens when you combine social and paid advertising? Research on Facebook ads with and without a social layer (Jimmy, Billy and 8 other friends are fans of Brand X), shows that social ads generate much stronger breakthrough and purchase intent than ads without a social layer. Why? Knowing that the advertised brand is liked by our friends builds trust.

Paid Advertising Works Harder with a Social Layer

2.       Paid Digital Advertising Drives “Owned Media” Usage

Digital advertising can drive consumers to a Brand’s owned media. In the example below, we look at the effectiveness of four different brands digital advertising in driving consumers to their respective web sites. Brands A & B were far more successful in doing so than Brands C & D.

Brand A

   Brand B

   Brand C

Brand D

% of those exposedto the online display campaign that went on to visit a brand’s site post-exposure 

4.7

       5.2

      1.0

1.2

% of those not exposedto the online display advertising who visited a brand’s site 

    0.5

       0.4

0.2

0.3

3.       Owned Can Work Harder Than “Paid Media”

What about owned media? Does it work once consumers arrive? One way of understanding this is to measure the off-line sales impact of those consumers exposed versus not exposed to your brand’s website. In the example below, we can see that exposure to Brand X’s owned digital media drove almost 3x the sales lift of paid digital ads alone.

Owned Media Can Work Harder than Paid

The Opportunity – Putting it All Together

Addressing the truth deficit in advertising is more than just making ads that are, well, true. It’s also about how to use paid, owned and earned media to your brand’s advantage.

Using the example above, why not build social into your paid advertising (where possible), use your paid ads to drive consumers to your website, and optimize your site to drive maximum on or off-line purchase? Why not experiment with the myriad of ways to engage your consumers across the paid, owned and earned continuum?

Because I’m betting that overcoming the trust deficit in advertising isn’t about making ads that aren’t misleading or exaggerated. It’s about adding in social and owned media experiences in ways that gives paid media more legitimacy and enables it to work harder for your brand.

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