Using TV Data to Optimize Digital

January 5, 2014

As the TV and digital worlds begin to merge, one of the more interesting new capabilities that advertisers and their agencies should be exploring is using TV audience viewing data to plan and buy digital audiences to increase total campaign effectiveness.

Videology's Mark McKee on Bringing TV data into Digital

Videology’s Mark McKee on Bringing TV data into Digital

In this BeetTV video, Videology’s Mark McKee explains some of the thinking behind this.

Using TV data to Optimize Digital

This  is important because historically, TV and Online planning and buying were done separately in most cases, missing a great opportunity to extend reach beyond random duplication of audiences. I wrote about this opportunity in a separate blog post earlier this year.

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by RSS reader

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by e-mail


Motley Fool: Advertising Reach is Bigger Than You Think

January 4, 2014

Motley Fool View on Measuring Time Shifted Viewing

Motley Fool View on Measuring Time Shifted Viewing

As advertising moves increasingly across screens, measurement needs to move fast to keep up.

This Motley Fool article takes a look at the time-shifted viewership of TV programs that occur outside the official C3 ratings, and the implications for media companies and advertisers.

Article: Advertising Reach is Bigger Than You Think

Moving forward, there will be two fundamental advertising models–linear and dynamic. In the linear, or traditional, model, one ad is served to many people. This can happen live or thru time shifted viewing. In the dynamic advertising model, one ad is served to a single individual–e.g. each ad is addressable.

Audience measurement of the future will need to take account of both linear and dynamic advertising insertion models and measure both live and on-demand viewership.

If this isn’t tricky enough, think about the implications for ad effectiveness: is an ad that is viewed 2 days later as effective as one delivered live ? Is an addressable ad sufficiently more effective than a less targeted linear ad to justify its price premium ?

The linear vs. dynamic and live vs. on-demand viewing patterns will almost certainly impact not just reach–but advertising performance as well. Measuring and understanding relative ad effectiveness across these dimensions will become even more important in the future.

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by RSS reader

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by e-mail


How Brands Grow – Blowing Up Marketing Shibboleths

January 3, 2014

How Brands Grow by Dr. Byron Sharp

If you’ve never read it, you should. Dr. Sharp, from the Ehrenberg Institute of Marketing Science, takes aim at many well established marketing beliefs and systematically demonstrates with data that they are often much overblown hype. If you’re a real Marketer, you owe it to yourself to read this book.

I particularly like his concepts of “mental and physical availability” as the most important drivers of brand growth. Advertising’s role is to create greater mental availability, and this is why real world “breakthrough” and memorability are such crucial gatekeeper metrics to advertising success.

I wrote a blog post book review on How Brands Grow some months back, but I recommend you read the book.

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by RSS reader

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by e-mail


Machine Reading Advertising Implications

December 11, 2013

Machine reading revolution has advertising and media implications #machinelearning #advertising http://ow.ly/rFxhA


Neuroscience in Advertising: Making the :15 the New :30

August 5, 2013

The :15 second TV commercial has a lot in common with cubic zirconium—a cheaper and lower quality “look-alike” that is almost instantly recognizable by anyone as anything but the real thing.

Often treated as an afterthought by Marketers and Agencies alike, the :15 TV spot is usually just a cut down version of the :30, rarely copy tested, but assumed to be at least 50% as good as the :30 from which it’s derived.

But the truth is that most Marketers have no idea how good, or bad, their :15’s really are. It’s as if everyone just blindly assumes the best, without thinking about the worst. Fifteen second ads adhere to the same basic principles of success as :30’s, but just get much less attention.

An Improvement — Real Time :15 vs. :30 Optimization

Things have improved somewhat over the past few years. With the advent of real time TV ad effectiveness measurement, Marketers can now monitor the performance of their :30’s and :15’s on a weekly or bi-weekly basis, so they can understand relative differences in performance.

This enables you to see when your 15’s perform well enough to warrant moving out of your :30’s and into 100% focus on your :15’s. But all of this is after the fact. What’s really needed is better :15 design beforehand. But how?

Neuroscience & Copy Testing

Neuroscience has had any number of fits and starts over the past few years when applied to Marketing. But one area where there has been substantial and undeniable progress is in the area of copy testing. Possibly the most advanced technique uses EEG measures of brain activity to understand how viewers are responding to advertising. This approach uses EEG to identify and capture responses to brain stimuli in fractions of a second.

In particular, EEG based copy testing can measure three things extremely well:

  1. Attention – When and how much viewer attention is paid to an ad. This is key to knowing if someone even notices or pays attention to your ad in the first place.
  2. Memory – Whether a viewers memory is activated in response to viewing an ad. Without memory, it’s unlikely that an ad will influence much future behavior.
  3. Emotion – To what degree a viewer is drawn to or pulls away from the ad stimulus. Attention and memory are important, but so is positive emotional attraction.

Taken together, these three measures are key to effective ads. They relate directly to whether someone pays attention to the ad, whether the ad is stored in long term memory, and whether the ad elicits a positive emotional response.

Importantly, EEG based copy testing measures viewer’s brain waves in milliseconds throughout the commercial. Typically, a viewer’s brain waves looks like a series of peaks and valleys as the viewer responds to different parts of the commercial. These peaks and valleys correspond to the parts of the commercial that are most and least effective as measured by attention, memory and emotion.

The Optimal :15 TV Spot

Back to the :30 vs. :15 conundrum: how do you design a better :15 TV spot? Well, it’s not as difficult as rocket science, but it’s essentially an exercise in brain wave assessment. Simply put, you cut out the ads “valleys” and keep the “peaks.”

Neuroscience based copy testing has advanced to the point where it can algorithmically eliminate the weakest portions of the :30 TV commercial while keeping the strongest ones for the new :15. This re-cut commercial is then edited by the Agency creatives for story flow, continuity, and visual seamlessness into a final spot.

The Neuroscience Based :15 TV Commercial – How Good ?

At this point, you might be asking: “but how good, really, are these cut down neuroscience based ads? It all sounds like a big black box.”

Based on Nielsen NeuroFocus (disclosure: I work at Nielsen) testing of both original :30 TV spots and the EEG-optimized :15’s, here is what we see:

  • ~90% of neuroscience optimized :15 ads test just as well as their :30 counterparts
  • A significant number of optimized :15 ads actually test better than their :30 counterparts

Upside for Marketers

So, the next time you see your Ad Agency, tell them that you have a “present” for them—neuroscience-based :15’s. They’re definitely a lot more valuable than regular “cubic zirconium” :15’s and, more importantly, viewers will respond as if they’re :30 “diamonds in the rough.”

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by RSS reader

Get free updates of Randall Beard’s Blog by e-mail


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 519 other followers