Guest Post: Five Myths Marketers Believe About Presentations

November 15, 2010

This post is part of a continuing series of guest posts. Diane DiResta is CEO of DiResta Communications, Inc., a New York City consultancy serving business leaders who want to communicate with greater impact.

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Having coached a number of marketers on their presentations, it’s come to my attention that when delivering presentations even the most creative marketing professionals may be sabotaging their success. The reason many marketing ideas are rejected by management is not because of the quality of the idea. It’s more often because of the way the idea is presented.

Five Myths Marketers Believe About Presentations

 

Here are five presentation myths that marketers need to dispel:

1. It’s about the numbers. I’ve seen marketing clients who believe that if the numbers back up their idea, it will sell. Nothing could be further from the truth. Marketers fall in love with the numbers and make this the focal point of the presentation. Then they’re shocked when senior management isn’t excited about their new product launch.

Reality: It’s passion that sells. I had one client who was shot down after presenting a new product. The reason was not because it wasn’t a good product. It was because it wasn’t a compelling presentation. The feedback her manager gave me was that she presented the facts but there was no enthusiasm. Tell the story behind the numbers. Senior management needs to be sold in the same way the consumer needs to be sold.

Marketers, Take Note: Passion Sells

 

2. Defend your position. One client got into hot water because of a need to defend his idea. When you’re wedded to your way of thinking you can alienate your boss and your supporters.

Reality:  Defending a position may actually backfire on you. Some marketers believe if it isn’t invented here, it doesn’t count. Being flexible and open to other ideas will up the ante on your presentation. Listening and questioning are the keys to success in selling your idea. If you don’t know the answer admit it and offer to get back to the questioner.  “Fake it til you make it” does not apply here. You’ll gain more credibility if you’re honest.

3. Tell them everything you know. Some marketers do a data dump, believing the listeners should be information rich.

Reality:   Good speaking like good marketing gets to the point. When pitching a product or concept if you give too many details, the listeners tune out.  Tell them what they need to know – not everything you know. When it comes to delivery, less is more.

Effective Public Speaking for Marketers

 

4. Keep Talking. Some marketers believe that by dominating the conversation they’ll push through their ideas. The squeaky wheel may get the grease but it won’t necessarily get you the business.

Reality: Know when to shut up. A running faucet will eventually flood a room. Don’t drown in your own verbiage. Come up for air. Master the pause.

5. The Company Knows Best. Departments  have their own culture. Expectations may range from using  a standard version of a PowerPoint template to having a tradition of all presenters being seated.

Reality: Tradition doesn’t have to reign. Breaking the rules can be used to your advantage. A text-only deck is not as impactful as slides that contain a few visuals. Just because presenters traditionally speak while seated in a boardroom, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t stand. Effective presenters know how to stand out and blend in. You can respect company culture and also infuse your personal brand.

To give a good presentation remember the three  Cs – clear, concise, and compelling.

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Diane DiResta is CEO of DiResta Communications, Inc., a New York City consultancy serving business leaders who want to communicate with greater impact — whether face-to-face, in front of a crowd or from an electronic platform.  DiResta is the author of Knockout Presentations: How to Deliver Your Message with Power, Punch, and Pizzazz, an Amazon.com category best-seller and widely-used text in college business communication courses. http://www.diresta.com

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Guest Post: Is a Mobile App in Your Company’s Future?

October 4, 2010

This post is part of a continuing series of guest posts and was originally posted on MENG BLEND. Drew McLellan is founder of McLellan Marketing Group.  

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All the indicators and trends suggest that smart phones will be our primary access point to the Internet by 2020.  Even today, you have to go out of your way to buy a mobile phone that does not have Internet access. 

Is a Mobile App in Your Company's Future?

 

We’ve watched mobile apps leapfrog onto the main stage as the proliferation of smart phones marches on. 

Like it or not, mobile connectivity in all its possible forms is where we’re headed.  Today, there are nearly 2 billion people actively using apps. Within a year or two, these are going to be as common as personalized ring tones or taking pictures with your phone. 

Add to that the fact that “mobile apps” is actually a much wider description than just our phones.  There’s also the iPad, netbooks, television set-top boxes, car electronics and browser-based apps.  Your customers are probably interacting with this technology more often than you might think. 

Which begs the question – does your company need a mobile app? 

Granted, there are plenty of silly ones like the bubble popping game but there are also thousands of practical, business-oriented apps that are yet another way of connecting to customers. 

The Walgreens app lets you refill prescriptions on the go, print photos you just took on your phone and find their closest store when you need some Zanfel for your vacation induced poison ivy! 

Walgreen's Company App

 

Think mobile apps are only for the big box stores or companies with multi-million dollar budgets?  Think again.  

Small companies are also grabbing hold of the technology… 

A local microbrewery in St. Louis, the Schlafly Tap Room, and Schlafly Beer realized that their customers liked to stop by and grab a growler of beer on their way home.  But they were hesitant to do so because they never knew what was on tap.  Enter the SchlAPP – a free iPhone app that gives patrons detailed descriptions of the available brews, Schlafly’s tweets and Facebook updates, locations and their monthly newsletter. 

New Local Mobile App: Schalfly Beer

 

And, check out how the Austin’s Avant Salon Spa is using their app.  They show off their award-winning hairstyles, keep their community plugged in to the area’s hottest charity events and their own promotions. 

Remember that we’re in the infancy of the mobile app explosion.  Which means that there’s value in being one of the first in your category to introduce an app.  But like all good marketing decisions, it’s important not to let the tool drive your strategy. 

Perhaps it’s time for a shift in perspective.  Rather than thinking why you wouldn’t ever create an app, you might want to start thinking about why you would. 

If you can make a compelling case for how an app would add value to your customers or prospects, then the opportunity is right now. 

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Drew McLellan is Top Dog at McLellan Marketing Group and the author of AdAge’s Top 150 blog, Drew’s Marketing Minute. Wall Street Journal called it “one of the ten blogs all entrepreneurs should read.” Drew wrote 99.3 Random Acts of Marketing and is co-creator/editor of the ground-breaking Age of Conversation book series. He is also a Marketing Profs Daily Fix blogger and can be followed at @drewmclellan on Twitter. 

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6 Steps for Turning Digital Chaos into Brand Equity

July 23, 2009

From my July 21 guest post on Branding Strategy Insider:

The marketing landscape is increasingly chaotic and getting more so. The old world of command and control marketing messaging is dead. And marketers are woefully unprepared to deal with this new reality. In a recent survey, over 70% of CMO’s surveyed said they feel ill-equipped to manage their brands in this new digital environment.

The explosion in new media channels, and the increasing ease with which consumers can react to, create content about, and generally discuss brands is challenging even the best marketers. How do you manage your brand in such a chaotic consumer empowered world ? How do you ensure that consumers understand your brand equity and that you drive a single minded understanding of your brand promise ?

Explosion of Media Channels

Media channels — paid and otherwise — are increasing exponentially. YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, webinars, forums, reviews, etc. are only the beginning. Everyday brings new options. Who had ever heard of Stumble Upon a year ago ? Consumers ability to access these new channels, engage with other consumers, and talk back to companies has radically changed how Marketing organizations need to behave. And it’s going to get worse before it gets better. The Social Map below by Brian Solis shows how many different options there are–and the pace of change is fast.

The Increasingly Chaotic Digital Landscape (courtesy of Brian Solis)

The Increasingly Chaotic Digital Landscape (courtesy of Brian Solis)

6 Steps for Turning Digital Chaos into Brand Equity

Here are 6 steps you can take to ensure your brand effectively engages consumers with your brand promise in this increasingly complex and chaotic environment:

  1. Be Different, Special and Better — Let’s start with a basic truth. Your brand equity is what consumers think it is–not what you think it is. Unfortunately, too many brands have brand equities that are identical to competitors. So, the starting point is to have a brand promise, and delivery of it, that is truly differentiated–a basic truth too often ignored in today’s frenzied world of media and digital innovation.
  2. Know Your Target’s Media Habits — Consumers consume media content differently. Know your targets media habits–traditional and new, and don’t be seduced by the latest media innovation if your target isn’t participating. Map their usage. Then, listen to the communities that are conversing about your brand, understand their priorities and beliefs, and identify respected opinion leaders.
  3. Measure Marketing Contact Point Impact — Understand not just what your target is doing, but the impact of different contact points.  Quantifying the relative impact of contact points provides a data-based framework for deciding where to focus your limited resources. Word of mouth has always been important, and digital is making it even more so. Thus, it’s critical to identify your categories “amplifiers” who drive it.
  4. Equip Your Organization to Deliver the Brand Promise — Knowing your brands key contact points, you can then map organizational ownership to each of these. Many “old line” functions are being impacted by new media–e.g. PR, Customer Service, etc. Ensure that they — not just Marketing — really understand your brand promise, what it means, and how to deliver it.
  5. Organize your Team to Engage Key Media Channels / Amplifiers — Establish teams to engage with consumers across your most important digital channels. Equip them with the talent and skills to publish, respond, and engage–whatever is required to focus the discussion on your key brand equities.
  6. Create Value-Added Content — Consumers want more from brands than just a restatement of the brand promise. They want relevant and creative content that surrounds and supports it. Sometimes, they even want to create it. Do your homework to understand what kind of content your consumer wants, whether and how they can contribute, and how it can support and reinforce your brand promise.

Reactive, Proactive or Engaging ?

It’s natural to feel that some of your Marketing communications are reactive and some are proactive. But engaging your target audience over time in an intelligent dialogue that drives your brand promise is key:

  • Lead with your brand promise in new and creative ways. Engage with consumers to interpret it based on their values and needs.
  • Give consumers a voice about your brand and brand promise by enabling feedback, comments and user generated content.
  • Guide consumers back to your brand promise, even when they have a negative experience or point of view. Ask “how could we do better?”
  • Use value-added content that surrounds and supports your brand promise to make it easier to engage consumers.

The key point is this: focus your limited resources. Focus on the most impactful, highest consumption media channels. Focus on building relevant, value-added content to surround and support your brand promise. And then focus your organization on engaging with your consumers across the key media channels in a conversation that continues to reinforce, develop and deepen your brand promise. Why ? So that when consumers think of your brand, they think of one thing — how you’re different, better and more special than the other guys.

What is your brand doing to turn digital chaos into brand equity ?

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